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Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Sep;13(9):955-964. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2017.01.024. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer's disease in the community.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia. Electronic address: matthewpase@gmail.com.
2
Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Jean Mayer-U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Department of Neurology, School of Medicine & Imaging of Dementia and Aging Laboratory, Center for Neuroscience, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA.
6
Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA, USA; Sections of Preventive Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Excess sugar consumption has been linked with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in animal models.

METHODS:

We examined the cross-sectional association of sugary beverage consumption with neuropsychological (N = 4276) and magnetic resonance imaging (N = 3846) markers of preclinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular brain injury (VBI) in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Intake of sugary beverages was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Relative to consuming less than one sugary beverage per day, higher intake of sugary beverages was associated with lower total brain volume (1-2/day, β ± standard error [SE] = -0.55 ± 0.14 mean percent difference, P = .0002; >2/day, β ± SE = -0.68 ± 0.18, P < .0001), and poorer performance on tests of episodic memory (all P < .01). Daily fruit juice intake was associated with lower total brain volume, hippocampal volume, and poorer episodic memory (all P < .05). Sugary beverage intake was not associated with VBI in a consistent manner across outcomes.

DISCUSSION:

Higher intake of sugary beverages was associated cross-sectionally with markers of preclinical AD.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Dementia; Diet; Framingham Heart Study; Sugar

PMID:
28274718
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2017.01.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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