Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Dermatol. 2017 Mar - Apr;35(2):201-206. doi: 10.1016/j.clindermatol.2016.10.015. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

The "red face": Not always rosacea.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Andreas Syggros Hospital, University of Athens, 5, Dragoumi str, Athens, 16121, Greece.
2
Department of Dermatology, Andreas Syggros Hospital, University of Athens, 5, Dragoumi str, Athens, 16121, Greece. Electronic address: Christinaantoniougr@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Facial erythema (the "red face") is a straightforward clinical finding, and it is evident even to the untrained eye; however, a red face does not represent a single cutaneous entity. It may be due to a plethora of distinct underlying conditions of varying severity, including rosacea, demodicosis, dermatomyositis, lupus erythematosus, allergic contact dermatitis, drug-induced erythema, and emotional blushing. In clinical practice, dermatologists do not encounter only one type of facial erythema but rather a number of different shades of red. This review presents the clinical spectrum of facial erythemas and addresses the question of what lies beneath a red face by discussing the key clinical and histopathologic characteristics.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center