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Cell Metab. 2017 Mar 7;25(3):610-621. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.02.005.

Matching Dietary Amino Acid Balance to the In Silico-Translated Exome Optimizes Growth and Reproduction without Cost to Lifespan.

Author information

1
Institute of Healthy Ageing and Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: matthew.piper@monash.edu.
2
Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Köln 50931, Germany.
3
Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin 10117, Germany.
4
Behavior and Metabolism Laboratory, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon 1400-038, Portugal.
5
UCL Ear Institute, University College London, London WC1X 8EE, UK.
6
Institute of Animal Genetics and Breeding, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu 611130, China.
7
Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney 2050, Australia.
8
Institute of Healthy Ageing and Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK; Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Köln 50931, Germany. Electronic address: partridge@age.mpg.de.

Abstract

Balancing the quantity and quality of dietary protein relative to other nutrients is a key determinant of evolutionary fitness. A theoretical framework for defining a balanced diet would both reduce the enormous workload to optimize diets empirically and represent a breakthrough toward tailoring diets to the needs of consumers. Here, we report a simple and powerful in silico technique that uses the genome information of an organism to define its dietary amino acid requirements. We show for the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster that such "exome-matched" diets are more satiating, enhance growth, and increase reproduction relative to non-matched diets. Thus, early life fitness traits can be enhanced at low levels of dietary amino acids that do not impose a cost to lifespan. Exome matching also enhanced mouse growth, indicating that it can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequence is known.

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila; amino acids; diet balance; dietary restriction; fitness; growth; lifespan; mouse; reproduction; trade-off

PMID:
28273481
PMCID:
PMC5355364
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2017.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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