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J Gen Intern Med. 2017 Apr;32(Suppl 1):40-47. doi: 10.1007/s11606-017-3987-0.

Behavioral Treatment for Veterans with Obesity: 24-Month Weight Outcomes from the ASPIRE-VA Small Changes Randomized Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia, 3187 University Way, Kelowna, BC, V1V 1V7, Canada. lesley.lutes@ubc.ca.
2
VA Center for Clinical Management Research, VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Center for Statistical Consultation and Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Midland Regional Campus, Midland, MI, USA.
6
Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
7
Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Small Changes (SC) is a weight management approach that demonstrated superior 12-month outcomes compared to the existing MOVE!® Weight Management Program at two Veterans Affairs (VA) sites. However, approaches are needed to help graduates of treatment continue to lose or maintain their weight over the longer term.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of the present study was to examine the effectiveness of a second year of low-intensity SC support compared to support offered by the usual care MOVE! programs.

DESIGN:

Following participation in the year-long Aspiring to Lifelong Health in VA (ASPIRE-VA) randomized controlled trial, participants were invited to extend their participation in their assigned program for another year. Three programs were extended to include six SC sessions delivered via telephone (ASPIRE-Phone) or an in-person group (ASPIRE-Group), or 12 sessions offered by the MOVE! programs.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three hundred thirty-two overweight/obese veterans who consented to extend their participation in the ASPIRE-VA trial by an additional year.

MAIN MEASURES:

Twenty-four-month weight change (kg).

KEY RESULTS:

Twenty-four months after baseline, participants in all three groups had modest weight loss (-1.40 kg [-2.61 to -0.18] in the ASPIRE-Group, -2.13 kg [-3.43 to -0.83] in ASPIRE-Phone, and -1.78 kg [-3.07 to -0.49] in MOVE!), with no significant differences among the three groups. Exploratory post hoc analyses revealed that participants diagnosed with diabetes initially benefited from the ASPIRE-Group program (-2.6 kg [-4.37 to 0.83]), but experienced significant weight regain during the second year (+2.8 kg [0.92-4.69]) compared to those without diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants in all three programs lost weight and maintained a statistically significant, though clinically modest, amount of weight loss over a 24-month period. Although participants in the ASPIRE-Group initially had greater weight loss, treatment was not sufficient to sustain weight loss through the second year, particularly in veterans with diabetes. Consistent, continuous-care treatment is needed to address obesity in the VA.

KEYWORDS:

behavioral medicine; clinical trials; obesity; veterans; weight management

PMID:
28271430
PMCID:
PMC5359162
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-017-3987-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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