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BMJ. 2017 Mar 6;356:i6795. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i6795.

Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) Statement.

Author information

1
Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK hilary.pinnock@ed.ac.uk.
2
Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children; Department of Psychiatry and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Canada.
3
Washington University Division of Emergency Medicine. Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, USA.
4
Pragmatic Clinical Trials Unit, Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, UK.
5
Primary Care Research Unit of Bizkaia, Basque Health Service, Spain.
6
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, UK.
7
Bangor Institute for Health & Medical Research, Bangor University, UK.
8
Montefiore Medical Center, The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA.
9
Research Department of Primary Care and Population Health, University College London, UK.
10
Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK.

Abstract

Implementation studies are often poorly reported and indexed, reducing their potential to inform initiatives to improve healthcare services. The Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) initiative aimed to develop guidelines for transparent and accurate reporting of implementation studies. Informed by the findings of a systematic review and a consensus-building e-Delphi exercise, an international working group of implementation science experts discussed and agreed the StaRI Checklist comprising 27 items. It prompts researchers to describe both the implementation strategy (techniques used to promote implementation of an underused evidence-based intervention) and the effectiveness of the intervention that was being implemented. An accompanying Explanation and Elaboration document (published in BMJ Open, doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013318) details each of the items, explains the rationale, and provides examples of good reporting practice. Adoption of StaRI will improve the reporting of implementation studies, potentially facilitating translation of research into practice and improving the health of individuals and populations.

PMID:
28264797
PMCID:
PMC5421438
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.i6795
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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