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Biochim Biophys Acta Gen Subj. 2017 May;1861(5 Pt A):1152-1158. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2017.02.029. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Effects of statins on the immunoglobulin G glycome.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Zagreb, Croatia.
2
Genos Glycoscience Research Laboratory, Zagreb, Croatia.
3
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK; Department of Nephrology, Hospital del Mar, Institut Mar d'Investigacions Mediques, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK; Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
5
Research Unit of Molecular Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany; German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD e.V.), Neuherberg, Germany.
6
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Laboratory of Prion Biology, Department of Neuroscience, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), Trieste, Italy.
8
Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UK.
9
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zagreb, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Zagreb, Croatia; Genos Glycoscience Research Laboratory, Zagreb, Croatia. Electronic address: glauc@pharma.hr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Statins are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide and usually many individuals involved in clinical and population studies are on statin therapy. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation has been associated with numerous cardiometabolic risk factors.

METHODS:

The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association of statin use with N-glycosylation of IgG. The association was analyzed in two large population cohorts (TwinsUK and KORA) using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC-UPLC) in the TwinsUK cohort and reverse phase liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) in the KORA cohort. Afterwards we investigated the same association for only one statin (rosuvastatin) in a subset of individuals from the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled JUPITER study using LC-ESI-MS for IgG glycome and HILIC-UPLC for total plasma N-glycome.

RESULTS:

In the TwinsUK population, the use of statins was associated with higher levels of core-fucosylated biantennary glycan structure with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (FA2B) and lower levels of core-fucosylated biantennary digalactosylated monosialylated glycan structure (FA2G2S1). The association between statin use and FA2B was replicated in the KORA cohort. In the JUPITER trial we found no statistically significant differences between the randomly allocated placebo and rosuvastatin groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the TwinsUK and KORA cohorts, statin use was associated with a small increase of pro-inflammatory IgG glycan, although this finding was not confirmed in a subset of participants from the JUPITER trial.

GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Even if the association between IgG N-glycome and statins exists, it is not large enough to pose a problem for glycomic studies.

KEYWORDS:

Immunoglobulin G; N-glycosylation; Rosuvastatin; Statin; Total plasma N-glycome

PMID:
28263871
PMCID:
PMC5441970
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbagen.2017.02.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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