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Sci Rep. 2017 Mar 6;7:43560. doi: 10.1038/srep43560.

A standardized method for lectin microarray-based tissue glycome mapping.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Research Institute for Drug Discovery, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan.
2
Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai Center for Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
3
Research Team for Geriatric Medicine, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Tokyo 173-0015, Japan.

Abstract

The significance of glycomic profiling has been highlighted by recent findings that structural changes of glycans are observed in many diseases, including cancer. Therefore, glycomic profiling of the whole body (glycome mapping) under different physiopathological states may contribute to the discovery of reliable biomarkers with disease-specific alterations. To achieve this, standardization of high-throughput and in-depth analysis of tissue glycome mapping is needed. However, this is a great challenge due to the lack of analytical methodology for glycans on small amounts of endogenous glycoproteins. Here, we established a standardized method of lectin-assisted tissue glycome mapping. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were prepared from brain, liver, kidney, spleen, and testis of two C57BL/6J mice. In total, 190 size-adjusted fragments with different morphology were serially collected from each tissue by laser microdissection and subjected to lectin microarray analysis. The results and subsequent histochemical analysis with selected lectins were highly consistent with previous reports of mass spectrometry-based N- and/or O-glycome analyses and histochemistry. This is the first report to look at both N- and O-glycome profiles of various regions within tissue sections of five different organs. This simple and reproducible mapping approach is also applicable to various disease model mice to facilitate disease-related biomarker discovery.

PMID:
28262709
PMCID:
PMC5337905
DOI:
10.1038/srep43560
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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