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Curr Biol. 2017 Mar 20;27(6):914-919. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.024. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Recent Visual Experience Shapes Visual Processing in Rats through Stimulus-Specific Adaptation and Response Enhancement.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Biological Psychology, KU Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; Laboratory for Neuro- and Psychophysiology, KU Leuven, O&N 2 Herestraat 49, Box 1021, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: kasper.vinken@kuleuven.be.
2
Laboratory for Neuro- and Psychophysiology, KU Leuven, O&N 2 Herestraat 49, Box 1021, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
3
Laboratory of Biological Psychology, KU Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: hans.opdebeeck@kuleuven.be.

Abstract

From an ecological point of view, it is generally suggested that the main goal of vision in rats and mice is navigation and (aerial) predator evasion [1-3]. The latter requires fast and accurate detection of a change in the visual environment. An outstanding question is whether there are mechanisms in the rodent visual system that would support and facilitate visual change detection. An experimental protocol frequently used to investigate change detection in humans is the oddball paradigm, in which a rare, unexpected stimulus is presented in a train of stimulus repetitions [4]. A popular "predictive coding" theory of cortical responses states that neural responses should decrease for expected sensory input and increase for unexpected input [5, 6]. Despite evidence for response suppression and enhancement in noninvasive scalp recordings in humans with this paradigm [7, 8], it has proven challenging to observe both phenomena in invasive action potential recordings in other animals [9-11]. During a visual oddball experiment, we recorded multi-unit spiking activity in rat primary visual cortex (V1) and latero-intermediate area (LI), which is a higher area of the rodent ventral visual stream. In rat V1, there was only evidence for response suppression related to stimulus-specific adaptation, and not for response enhancement. However, higher up in area LI, spiking activity showed clear surprise-based response enhancement in addition to stimulus-specific adaptation. These results show that neural responses along the rat ventral visual stream become increasingly sensitive to changes in the visual environment, suggesting a system specialized in the detection of unexpected events.

KEYWORDS:

adaptation; change detection; mismatch negativity; oddball; predictive coding; rat; repetition suppression; response enhancement; surprise response; visual cortex

PMID:
28262485
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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