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Thromb Res. 2017 Mar;151 Suppl 1:S43-S47. doi: 10.1016/S0049-3848(17)30066-X.

Antiphospholipid syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: rcervera@clinic.cat.

Abstract

The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is defined by the development of venous and/or arterial thromboses, often multiple, and pregnancy morbidity (mainly, recurrent fetal losses), in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Some estimates indicate that the incidence of the APS is around 5 new cases per 100,000 persons per year and the prevalence around 40-50 cases per 100,000 persons. The aPL are positive in approximately 13% of patients with stroke, 11% with myocardial infarction, 9.5% of patients with deep vein thrombosis and 6% of patients with pregnancy morbidity. Currently, there is consensus in treating APS patients with thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation and to prevent obstetric manifestations with the use of aspirin and heparin. This review summarizes the main knowledge on the clinical and therapeutic aspects of this syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

Anticardiolipin antibodies; Antiphospholipid syndrome; Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome; Lupus anticoagulant

PMID:
28262233
DOI:
10.1016/S0049-3848(17)30066-X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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