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Acad Pediatr. 2017 Mar;17(2):149-152. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.005.

Shift Schedules and Intern Work Hours, Patient Numbers, Conference Attendance, and Sleep at a Single Pediatric Residency Program.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Inpatient Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah. Electronic address: irene.kocolas@hsc.utah.edu.
2
Department of Pediatric Inpatient Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Mo.
4
Department of Pediatric Research Enterprise, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.
5
Department of General Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.
6
Department of Pediatric Education Enterprise, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.
7
Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The effects of 2011 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour standards on intern work hours, patient load, conference attendance, and sleep have not been fully determined. We prospectively compared intern work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality in a 2011 ACGME duty hour-compliant shift schedule with a 2003 ACGME duty hour-compliant call schedule at a single pediatric residency program.

METHODS:

Interns were assigned to shift or call schedules during 4 alternate months in the winter of 2010-2011. Work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality were tracked.

RESULTS:

Interns worked significantly fewer hours per week on day (73.2 hours) or night (71.6 hours) shifts than during q4 call (79.6 hours; P < .01). During high census months, shift schedule interns cared for significantly more patients/day (8.1/day shift vs 6.2/call; P < .001) and attended significantly fewer conferences than call schedule interns. Night shift interns slept more hours per 24-hour period than call schedule interns (7.2 ± 0.5 vs 6.3 ± 0.9 hours; P < .05) and had more consistent sleep patterns.

CONCLUSIONS:

A shift schedule resulted in reduced intern work hours and improved sleep duration and pattern. Although intern didactic conference attendance declined significantly during high census months, opportunities for experiential learning remained robust with unchanged or increased intern patient numbers.

KEYWORDS:

ACGME; conference attendance; resident duty hours; sleep

PMID:
28259336
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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