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J Sex Med. 2017 Apr;14(4):526-534. doi: 10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.01.020. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Sexual Pleasure and Function, Coital Trauma, and Sex Behaviors After Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Among Men in the Dominican Republic.

Author information

1
School of Public Health and Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: mbrito@uic.edu.
2
School of Public Health and Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
4
Clinica de Familia, La Romana, Dominican Republic.
5
HIV Vaccine Trials Unit, Instituto Dermatológico y Cirugía De Piel, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) is effective in decreasing the risk of HIV acquisition. As men resume sexual activity after circumcision, it will be important to study their satisfaction with the procedure, sexual pleasure and function, coital trauma, and risk compensation (RC), which can hamper or facilitate the long-term success of VMMC programs.

AIM:

To assess men's satisfaction with VMMC, sexual pleasure and function, coital trauma, and RC after VMMC.

METHODS:

This is a cohort study of circumcised men who presented for follow-up 6 to 24 months after VMMC. Logarithmic binomial regression was performed to explore factors associated with any increase in the number of sex partners after VMMC as a measurement of RC.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

(i) Men's satisfaction with their VMMC; (ii) sexual pleasure and function after VMMC; (iii) coital trauma; and (iv) RC.

RESULTS:

Of 454 circumcised men, 362 (80%) returned for a follow-up visit 6 to 24 months after VMMC. Almost all (98%) were satisfied with the outcome of their VMMC; most (95%) reported that their female partners were satisfied with their circumcision. Two thirds (67%) reported enjoying sex more after VMMC and most were very satisfied or somewhat satisfied (94%) with sexual intercourse after VMMC. Sexual function improved and reported sex-induced coital injuries decreased significantly in most men after VMMC. There was an increase in the proportion of men who reported at least two sexual partners after VMMC compared with baseline. In multivariate analysis, having sex with a woman they met the same day (adjusted relative risk = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2-2.4) and having at least two sexual partners at baseline (adjusted relative risk = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8) were associated with the outcome of any increase in the number of partners after VMMC.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

VMMC can be offered to Dominican men for HIV prevention without adversely affecting sexual pleasure or function. The procedure substantially reduces coital trauma.

STRENGTHS & LIMITATIONS:

This is the first report of long-term overall satisfaction, sexual pleasure/function and sex behaviors in the context of VMMC outside of Africa. Limitations of the study included the reliance on self-reported sex behaviors, the lack of physiologic measurement of penile sensitivity and the lack of follow up data beyond 24 months, which precludes the assessment of longer term RC.

CONCLUSION:

The study confirmed men's long-term satisfaction with the outcome of their VMMC. VMMC improved sexual pleasure and function for most men and significantly decreased coital injuries. There was mixed evidence of RC. Brito MO, Khosla S, Pananookooln S, et al. Sexual Pleasure and Function, Coital Trauma, and Sex Behaviors After Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Among Men in the Dominican Republic. J Sex Med 2017;14:526-534.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral Disinhibition; Dominican Republic; HIV and AIDS; Male Circumcision; Risk Compensation

PMID:
28258953
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.01.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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