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Health Place. 2017 May;45:17-23. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.02.008. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Liquor landscapes: Does access to alcohol outlets influence alcohol consumption in young adults?

Author information

1
Centre for the Built Environment and Health, School of Agriculture & Environment and School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia. Electronic address: sarah.foster@uwa.edu.au.
2
Centre for the Built Environment and Health, School of Agriculture & Environment and School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia; Telethon Kids Institute, 100 Roberts Road, Subiaco WA 6008, Australia; School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia.
3
Centre for the Built Environment and Health, School of Agriculture & Environment and School of Human Sciences, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia.
4
Telethon Kids Institute, 100 Roberts Road, Subiaco WA 6008, Australia; Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, 17 Liverpool Street, Hobart, Tasmania 7000, Australia.
5
School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia; Centre for Social Impact, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia.
6
School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009, Australia.

Abstract

Few longitudinal studies have examined the impact of liquor licences on alcohol consumption, and none in young adults, the life stage when alcohol intake is at its highest. We examined associations between liquor licences (i.e., general licences, on-premise licences, liquor stores, and club licences) and alcohol consumption at 20-years (n=988) and 22-years (n=893), and whether changes in the licences between time-points influenced alcohol consumption (n=665). Only general licences were associated with alcohol consumption at 20-years (p=0.037), but by 22-years, all licences types were positively associated with alcohol consumption (p<0.05). Longitudinal analyses showed that for each increase in liquor stores over time, alcohol consumption increased by 1.22g/day or 8% (p=0.030), and for each additional club licence, consumption increased by 0.90g/day or 6% (p=0.007). Limiting liquor licences could contribute to a reduction in young adults' alcohol intake.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Alcohol outlet density; Licence types; Longitudinal; Neighbourhood; Young adults

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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