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Clin Oral Investig. 2018 Jan;22(1):151-159. doi: 10.1007/s00784-017-2094-2. Epub 2017 Mar 3.

Integrating genomic data from high-throughput studies with computational modeling reveals differences in the molecular basis of hyposalivation between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
The Goodman faculty of life sciences, Nanotechnology building, Bar Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel.
2
The Goodman faculty of life sciences, Nanotechnology building, Bar Ilan University, 52900, Ramat Gan, Israel. Nili@ofranlab.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are accompanied by a high prevalence of hyposalivation (decreased salivary secretion), resulting in oral tissue damage. However, the molecular basis for the hyposalivation is yet unknown. Identifying genes and proteins that account for diabetes-related hyposalivation will help understanding the basis for this condition and identifying disease biomarkers in saliva.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We integrated genomic data from 110 high-throughput studies with computational modeling, to explore the relationship between diabetes and salivary glands on a genomic scale.

RESULTS:

A significant overlap exists between genes that are altered in both types of diabetes and genes that are expressed in salivary glands; 87 type 1 diabetes and 34 type 2 diabetes associated genes are also common to salivary glands. However, the overlap between these genes is not significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes associated genes are involved in the salivary secretion process, but mostly at different parts of it. This suggests that type 1 and type 2 diabetes impair salivary secretion by affecting different processes in the salivary tissue.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The genomic characteristics of Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may explain differences in salivary gland tissues morphology and saliva composition in people with diabetes, and suggest candidate proteins for diabetes salivary biomarkers.

KEYWORDS:

Computational biology; Diabetes; Genome; Salivary glands; Salivation; Xerostomia

PMID:
28255753
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-017-2094-2

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