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Int J Public Health. 2017 Jun;62(5):521-529. doi: 10.1007/s00038-017-0957-6. Epub 2017 Mar 2.

Acculturation and health-related quality of life: results from the German National Cohort migrant feasibility study.

Author information

1
Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Achterstr. 30, 28359, Bremen, Germany. brand@bips.uni-bremen.de.
2
Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology-BIPS, Achterstr. 30, 28359, Bremen, Germany.
3
Robert Koch Institute, Berlin, Germany.
4
Institute of Social Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Economics, Charité Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
5
Institute for Medical Sociology, Centre for Health and Society, Medical Faculty, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany.
6
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE), University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany.
7
Department of Epidemiology and International Public Health, Bielefeld School of Public Health (BiSPH), Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
8
AID Information Service: Food, Agriculture, Consumer Protection, Bonn, Germany.
9
German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
10
Institute of Public Health, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
11
Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
12
Health Sciences Bremen, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed the association between acculturation and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among persons with a Turkish migrant background in Germany.

METHODS:

1226 adults of Turkish origin were recruited in four German cities. Acculturation was assessed using the Frankfurt Acculturation Scale resulting in four groups (integration, assimilation, separation and marginalization). Short Form-8 physical and mental components were used to assess the HRQoL. Associations were analysed with linear regression models.

RESULTS:

Of the respondents, 20% were classified as integrated, 29% assimilated, 29% separated and 19% as marginalized. Separation was associated with poorer physical and mental health (linear regression coefficient (RC) = -2.3, 95% CI -3.9 to -0.8 and RC = -2.4, 95% CI -4.4 to -0.5, respectively; reference: integration). Marginalization was associated with poorer mental health in descendants of migrants (RC = -6.4, 95% CI -12.0 to -0.8; reference: integration).

CONCLUSIONS:

Separation and marginalization are associated with a poorer HRQoL. Policies should support the integration of migrants, and health promotion interventions should target separated and marginalized migrants to improve their HRQoL.

KEYWORDS:

Acculturation; Germany; Health-related quality of life; Immigrants; Turkey

PMID:
28255647
DOI:
10.1007/s00038-017-0957-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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