Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2017 Aug;88(8):648-652. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2016-315099. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Stability of mild cognitive impairment in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2
Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
3
John van Geest Centre for Brain Repair, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
4
School of Medicine & Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Southport, Queensland, Australia.
5
School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is common in early Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated the stability of PD-MCI over time to determine its clinical utility as a marker of disease.

METHODS:

212 newly diagnosed participants with PD were recruited into a longitudinal study and reassessed after 18 and 36 months. Participants completed a range of clinical and neuropsychological assessments. PD-MCI was classified using Movement Disorders Society Task Force level I (Montreal Cognitive Assessment <26) and level II (using cut-offs of 1, 1.5 and 2SD) criteria.

RESULTS:

After 36 months, 75% of participants returned; 8% of patients had developed a dementia all of which were previously PD-MCI. Applying level I criteria, 70% were cognitively stable, 19% cognitively declined and 11% improved over 36 months. Applying level II criteria (1, 1.5 and 2SD), 25% were cognitively stable, 41% cognitively declined, 15% improved and 19% fluctuated over 36 months. 18% of participants reverted to normal cognition from PD-MCI.

DISCUSSION:

Cognitive impairment in PD is complex, with some individuals' function fluctuating over time and some reverting to normal cognition. PD-MCI level I criteria may have greater clinical convenience, but more comprehensive level II criteria with 2SD cut-offs may offer greater diagnostic certainty.

KEYWORDS:

COGNITION; DEMENTIA; PARKINSON'S DISEASE

PMID:
28250029
PMCID:
PMC5537517
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp-2016-315099
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center