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Am J Hum Biol. 2017 Jul 8;29(4). doi: 10.1002/ajhb.22989. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Association between blood pressure and magnesium and uric acid levels in indigenous Argentinean children at high altitude.

Author information

1
University of Buenos Aires UBA, Paediatric Nutrition Buenos Aires, Argentina. Hidalgo Laboratories, Biochemistry, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
2
Hospital Universitario Cruces, BioCruces, Paediatric Endocrinology, UPV-EHU, CIBERDEM, CIBERER Bilbao, Bilbao, Spain.
3
Members of the San Antonio de los Cobres Study Group Collaborators are Graciela Colque, MD, Hospital San Antonio de los Cobres (Salta, Argentina); Inés M. Urrutia, MD, Hospital Universitario Cruces, BioCruces (Bilbao, Spain); Marcelo Figueroa, MD, Centro Mater (Salta Argentina); Milva Sanchez, MS, Hidalgo Laboratories (Buenos Aires, Argentina); Mariana Hidalgo, MS, Hidalgo Laboratories (Buenos Aires, Argentina); Claudio Adranda, MS, University of Buenos Aires (Buenos Aires, Argentina); and Jose Gonzalez, MS, Escuela Hogar San Antonio de los Cobres (Salta Argentina).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the association between nontraditional risk factors such as magnesium and uric acid with blood pressure (BP) in Indigenous children.

METHODS:

A total of 263 school-aged indigenous children living at high altitude were enrolled in a cross-sectional study in November 2011. Prehypertension (preHTN) and hypertension (HTN) were defined by systolic and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90th to <95th percentile or ≥95th percentile respectively, according to age, sex, and height.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of preHTN and HTN was 13.7 and 8.3%, respectively. Low magnesium levels were identified in 21.7% (57/263): 28.1% (16/57) of the children with low magnesium levels had preHTN versus 9.7% (20/206) with normal magnesium values. Furthermore, 21.8% (12/57) of the children with low magnesium levels had HTN versus 4.5% (20/206) with normal magnesium values. There was a significant association between mean arterial pressure and magnesium (r = -026), uric acid (r = 0.20), phosphorus (r = -0.17), z-BMI (r = 0.22), potassium (r = -0.10), HOMA-IR (r = 0.17), calcium (r = -0.10), and sodium (r = -0.13). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that mean arterial pressure was associated significantly and directly with BMI, age, gender, and uric acid; and inversely with magnesium, adjusted for sodium, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and HOMA-IR (R2  = 0.43). Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that magnesium (OR = 0.015) and uric acid (OR = 2.95) were significantly associated with preHTN. Similar results were obtained when preHTN was replaced by HTN.

CONCLUSION:

Our results indicate that HTN was associated inversely with magnesium and positively with uric acid in indigenous school children.

PMID:
28247956
DOI:
10.1002/ajhb.22989
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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