Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Methods Mol Biol. 2017;1556:329-341. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6771-1_18.

Optimization of Satellite Cell Culture Through Biomaterials.

Author information

1
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College Street Rm. 407, Toronto, M5S 3G9, Canada.
2
Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
3
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, 164 College Street Rm. 407, Toronto, M5S 3G9, Canada. penney.gilbert@utoronto.ca.
4
Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. penney.gilbert@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

Hydrogels, a type of biomaterial, are an invaluable part of biomedical research as they are highly hydrated and properties such as elasticity, porosity, and ligand density can be tuned to desired values. Recently, culture substrate stiffness was found to be an important regulator of muscle stem cell self-renewal. Polyethylene glycol (PEG), a synthetic polymer, can be fabricated into hydrogels that match the softness of skeletal muscle tissue, thereby providing a culture surface that is optimal for maintaining muscle stem cell self-renewal potential ex vivo. In this Chapter, we describe a method to produce flat PEG hydrogels across a range of stiffnesses, including a formulation that matches the bulk stiffness of healthy skeletal muscle (12 kPa), while maintaining a constant ligand density. Since PEG is inert to protein adsorption, the steps required to surface functionalize the hydrogel with an adhesive interface (e.g., laminin) are also described.

KEYWORDS:

Culture substrate; Hydrogel; Muscle stem cell; Polyethylene glycol; Self-renewal; Substrate stiffness

PMID:
28247359
DOI:
10.1007/978-1-4939-6771-1_18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center