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Perspect Med Educ. 2017 Apr;6(2):108-114. doi: 10.1007/s40037-017-0340-6.

Burnout, quality of life, motivation, and academic achievement among medical students: A person-oriented approach.

Author information

1
Ko Awatea, Counties Manukau Health, Auckland, New Zealand. mataroria.lyndon@auckland.ac.nz.
2
Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical Campus, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. mataroria.lyndon@auckland.ac.nz.
3
Centre for Medical & Health Sciences Education, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
4
Ko Awatea, Counties Manukau Health, Auckland, New Zealand.
5
Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical Campus, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to identify burnout and quality of life profiles of medical students and determine their associations with academic motivation and achievement on progress tests using a person-oriented approach.

METHODS:

Medical students (n = 670) in Year 3 to Year 5 at the University of Auckland were classified into three different profiles as derived from a two-step cluster analysis using World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF scores and Copenhagen Burnout Inventory scores. The profiles were used as independent variables to assess differences in academic motivation and achievement on progress tests using a multivariate analysis of co-variance and repeated measures analysis of co-variance methods.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 47%. Three clusters were obtained: Higher Burnout Lower Quality of Life (n = 62, 20%), Moderate Burnout Moderate Quality of Life (n = 131, 41%), and Lower Burnout Higher Quality of Life (n = 124, 39%). After controlling for gender and year level, Higher Burnout Lower Quality of Life students had significantly higher test anxiety (p < 0.0001) and amotivation scores (p < 0.0001); and lower intrinsic motivation (p < 0.005), self-efficacy (p < 0.001), and progress test scores (p = 0.03) compared with the other profiles.

CONCLUSION:

Burnout and Quality of Life profiles of medical students are associated with differences in academic motivation and achievement over time.

KEYWORDS:

Academic motivation; Burnout; Medical education; Progress testing; Quality of life

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