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Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2017 Feb 28. doi: 10.1111/bcp.13273. [Epub ahead of print]

Preparedness of newly qualified doctors in Ireland for prescribing in clinical practice.

Author information

1
Geriatric and Stroke Medicine, Beaumont hospital, RCSI.
2
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland School of Pharmacy.
3
Medical Education, National University of Ireland - Galway.
4
Beaumont Hospital, Vascular Surgery.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the level of preparedness of newly qualified Irish trained doctors for prescribing, and to investigate their attitudes towards prescribing and prescribing education, through a national survey.

METHODS:

A 29 item online survey was distributed to 686 newly qualified doctors one month prior to the completion of their first year of clinical practice (internship). Only graduates from Irish medical schools were included.

RESULTS:

The response rate was 20.4% (n=140, F: M 56%: 44%). The majority of respondents felt confident in prescription writing (89%), medication history taking (81%), and accessing drug information in the hospital setting (80%). Only 58% of respondents felt confident in drug dose calculation, and 35% felt confident in preparing and administering drugs. When asked if their undergraduate medical education had prepared them for prescribing in clinical practice, 28% of respondents agreed. Confidence that their undergraduate education had prepared them was associated with receiving formal training in prescribing skills (p=0.0045, 27% v 0%). 37% of respondents agreed that they felt stressed about prescribing medications.

CONCLUSION:

This survey of newly qualified doctors in Ireland found that only 28% of respondents agreed that their undergraduate medical education had prepared them for prescribing; comparable to a previous survey of UK medical students and graduates. Investigating confidence and preparedness for prescribing provides important insights for educators. Dedicated teaching of prescribing, with an emphasis on practical training and assessment, may help graduates feel more prepared for the challenges of prescribing in the clinical setting.

KEYWORDS:

clinical pharmacology; education; prepared; prescribing

PMID:
28244609
DOI:
10.1111/bcp.13273
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