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Physiol Behav. 2017 May 1;173:298-304. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.02.032. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

Time-restricted feeding on weekdays restricts weight gain: A study using rat models of high-fat diet-induced obesity.

Author information

1
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; The Central Norway Regional Health Authority, Norway.
2
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
3
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; The Central Norway Regional Health Authority, Norway; Center for Obesity Research, Department of Surgery, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway.
4
Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; The Central Norway Regional Health Authority, Norway; Center for Obesity Research, Department of Surgery, St. Olav's Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: duan.chen@ntnu.no.

Abstract

A recent study reported that a special weekly scheduled time-restricted feeding regimen (TRF), i.e., no food consumption for 15h during the light (inactive) phase per day for 5 weekdays, attenuated the outcome of diverse nutritional challenges in response to high-fat diet in mice. In the present study, we wanted to further test whether this TRF could restrict body weight gain in both juvenile and adult animals when fed a high-fat diet. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats at ages from 5 to 27weeks were used. First, we found that freely fed rats with 60% fat diet gained weight significantly, which was associated with more calorie intake (particularly during light phase) than those fed standard food (7% fat). Secondly, we found that TRF restricted high-fat diet-induced weight gain in both groups of juvenile rats (5 and 13weeks of age) compared to freely fed rats with high-fat diet, despite the same levels of 24h-calorie intake during either weekdays or the weekend. Thirdly, we found that TRF did not restrict high-fat diet-induce weight gain in adult rats (27weeks of age). Thus, we suggest that this special TRF regimen could be further tested in humans (particularly young adults) for the purpose of obesity prevention.

KEYWORDS:

Body weight; Circadian rhythm; Feeding behavior; Food intake; Obesity

PMID:
28242469
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.02.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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