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Vet Immunol Immunopathol. 2017 Mar;185:20-33. doi: 10.1016/j.vetimm.2017.01.004. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

Safety and immunogenicity of mammalian cell derived and Modified Vaccinia Ankara vectored African swine fever subunit antigens in swine.

Author information

1
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, United States. Electronic address: loperamadrid@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, 53706, United States. Electronic address: osorio@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu.
3
Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States. Electronic address: yongqunh@med.umich.edu.
4
Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States. Electronic address: xiangzsh@gmail.com.
5
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-4467, United States. Electronic address: GADAMS@cvm.tamu.edu.
6
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-4467, United States. Electronic address: richard.laughlin@tamuk.edu.
7
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-4467, United States. Electronic address: wmwangi@vet.k-state.edu.
8
Bioo Scientific Corporation, 7050 Burleson Rd., Austin, TX, 78744, United States. Electronic address: sandeshs@biooscientific.com.
9
Plum Island Animal Disease Center, U. S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology, Greenport, New York, United States. Electronic address: john.neilan@HQ.DHS.GOV.
10
Plum Island Animal Disease Center, U. S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology, Greenport, New York, United States. Electronic address: David.Brake@ST.DHS.GOV.
11
Plum Island Animal Disease Center, U. S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology, Greenport, New York, United States. Electronic address: thomas.burrage@HQ.DHS.GOV.
12
Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States. Electronic address: wclayb@umich.edu.
13
Institute for Infectious Animal Disease, 2501 Earl Rudder Hwy, Suite 701, College Station, TX, 77845, United States. Electronic address: Alfonso.Clavijo@inspection.gc.ca.
14
Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory,1 Sippel Rd., College Station, TX, 77843, United States. Electronic address: mbounpheng@gmail.com.

Abstract

A reverse vaccinology system, Vaxign, was used to identify and select a subset of five African Swine Fever (ASF) antigens that were successfully purified from human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK) cells and produced in Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) viral vectors. Three HEK-purified antigens [B646L (p72), E183L (p54), and O61R (p12)], and three MVA-vectored antigens [B646L, EP153R, and EP402R (CD2v)] were evaluated using a prime-boost immunization regimen swine safety and immunogenicity study. Antibody responses were detected in pigs following prime-boost immunization four weeks apart with the HEK-293-purified p72, p54, and p12 antigens. Notably, sera from the vaccinees were positive by immunofluorescence on ASFV (Georgia 2007/1)-infected primary macrophages. Although MVA-vectored p72, CD2v, and EP153R failed to induce antibody responses, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ+) spot forming cell responses against all three antigens were detected one week post-boost. The highest IFN-γ+ spot forming cell responses were detected against p72 in pigs primed with MVA-p72 and boosted with the recombinant p72. Antigen-specific (p12, p72, CD2v, and EP153R) T-cell proliferative responses were also detected post-boost. Collectively, these results are the first demonstration that ASFV subunit antigens purified from mammalian cells or expressed in MVA vectors are safe and can induce ASFV-specific antibody and T-cell responses following a prime-boost immunization regimen in swine.

KEYWORDS:

African swine fever virus; HEK-293; MVA; Recombinant protein expression; Reverse vaccinology; Vaccine development

PMID:
28241999
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetimm.2017.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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