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J Am Chem Soc. 2017 Mar 8;139(9):3446-3455. doi: 10.1021/jacs.6b11273. Epub 2017 Feb 27.

Small Molecule Inhibition of microRNA-210 Reprograms an Oncogenic Hypoxic Circuit.

Author information

1
Department of Chemistry, ‡Department of Molecular Therapeutics, and §Department of Neuroscience, The Scripps Research Institute , 130 Scripps Way, Jupiter, Florida 33458, United States.

Abstract

A hypoxic state is critical to the metastatic and invasive characteristics of cancer. Numerous pathways play critical roles in cancer maintenance, many of which include noncoding RNAs such as microRNA (miR)-210 that regulates hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Herein, we describe the identification of a small molecule named Targapremir-210 that binds to the Dicer site of the miR-210 hairpin precursor. This interaction inhibits production of the mature miRNA, derepresses glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like enzyme (GPD1L), a hypoxia-associated protein negatively regulated by miR-210, decreases HIF-1α, and triggers apoptosis of triple negative breast cancer cells only under hypoxic conditions. Further, Targapremir-210 inhibits tumorigenesis in a mouse xenograft model of hypoxic triple negative breast cancer. Many factors govern molecular recognition of biological targets by small molecules. For protein, chemoproteomics and activity-based protein profiling are invaluable tools to study small molecule target engagement and selectivity in cells. Such approaches are lacking for RNA, leaving a void in the understanding of its druggability. We applied Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP) to study the cellular selectivity and the on- and off-targets of Targapremir-210. Targapremir-210 selectively recognizes the miR-210 precursor and can differentially recognize RNAs in cells that have the same target motif but have different expression levels, revealing this important feature for selectively drugging RNAs for the first time. These studies show that small molecules can be rapidly designed to selectively target RNAs and affect cellular responses to environmental conditions, resulting in favorable benefits against cancer. Further, they help define rules for identifying druggable targets in the transcriptome.

PMID:
28240549
PMCID:
PMC5810126
DOI:
10.1021/jacs.6b11273
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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