Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pediatr Diabetes. 2017 Dec;18(8):890-894. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12504. Epub 2017 Feb 27.

Type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents is not associated with a reduced prevalence of atopy and allergic diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory and Allergic Disease, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
3
Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) as well as allergies in childhood have increased worldwide during the last 2 decades. The reasons for this increase are still unknown but early life origins are being discussed, such as dietary and hygiene factors that may play a role in the development of both diseases. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of allergies in children with and without T1D and to define potential influencing factors.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Data were collected from 104 patients with T1D (n = 104; mean age 11.4 ± 4.4 years; m/f: 77/27) and 104 healthy controls (CG) (n = 104; mean age 11.4 ± 4.3 years; m/f: 77/27). A questionnaire on allergic symptoms was obtained from each individual. In parallel, ImmunoCAP tests to detect specific allergen sensitization were performed.

RESULTS:

Allergen sensitization rates were not significantly different between both groups (T1D: 42% vs CG 38%; P = 0.625). In both groups, a comparable number of patients reported allergic symptoms in the questionnaire (T1D: 20% vs CG 26%; P = 0.43). Allergen sensitization and allergic symptoms were independent of breastfeeding, pets at home or diabetes duration. However, in T1D, fewer family members smoked (T1D: 10% vs CG 56%; P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The present cohort study shows the same prevalence of allergy and atopy in a pediatric diabetes population compared to healthy controls. Diabetes per se does not seem to influence the development of allergies.

KEYWORDS:

T1D ; allergy; atopy; children; prevalence

PMID:
28239959
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12504
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center