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J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2017;28(1):266-278. doi: 10.1353/hpu.2017.0022.

The Role of Historically Black College and University Medical Schools in Academic Medicine.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Although less than 3% of medical schools are considered Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), they have played a significant role in the education of Black physicians.

METHODS:

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) databases were used to obtain faculty and student demographic data from 2003-2013. We analyzed racial distributions of faculty and students at HBCU medical schools compared with all other medical schools and calculated correlations between rates of Black chairs, faculty, and students.

RESULTS:

Although HBCUs represent 2.4% of medical colleges, they house 31% of Black chairs, 10% of Black faculty and 14% of Black students. A significant (a* < .002) positive correlation was found between rates of Black chairs and students.

CONCLUSIONS:

Black chairs are associated with higher percentages of Black students. Medical colleges may find that increasing the number of Black chairs increases the number of Black medical students.

PMID:
28239001
DOI:
10.1353/hpu.2017.0022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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