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Alzheimers Dement. 2017 Aug;13(8):947-952. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2017.01.015. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

Bridging cognitive screening tests in neurologic disorders: A crosswalk between the short Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Mini-Mental State Examination.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address: droalf@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Alzheimer's Disease Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Udall Center for Parkinson's Research, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECC) at the Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Department of Neurology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Alzheimer's Disease Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

To provide a crosswalk between the recently proposed short Montreal Cognitive Assessment (s-MoCA) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) within a clinical cohort.

METHODS:

A total of 791 participants, with and without neurologic conditions, received both the MMSE and the MoCA at the same visit. s-MoCA scores were calculated and equipercentile equating was used to create a crosswalk between the s-MoCA and MMSE.

RESULTS:

As expected, s-MoCA scores were highly correlated (Pearson r = 0.82, P < .001) with MMSE scores. s-MoCA scores correctly classified 85% of healthy older adults and 91% of individuals with neurologic conditions that impair cognition. In addition, we provide an easy to use table that enables the conversion of s-MoCA score to MMSE score.

DISCUSSION:

The s-MoCA is quick to administer, provides high sensitivity and specificity for cognitive impairment, and now can be compared directly with the MMSE.

KEYWORDS:

Brief cognitive test; Cognitive screening; MMSE; Test equating; s-MoCA

PMID:
28238740
PMCID:
PMC5554086
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2017.01.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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