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BJOG. 2017 Jun;124(7):1107-1114. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.14534. Epub 2017 Feb 25.

Hyperemesis gravidarum and cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents: a follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academic Medical Centre at the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Faculty of Medicine, Centre For Life-Course Health Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
4
Unit of Primary Care, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
5
Biocentre Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
6
Department of Genomics of Complex Diseases, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
8
Chronic Disease Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
9
Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
10
PEDEGO Research Unit, MRC Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the long-term consequences of prenatal exposure to maternal hyperemesis gravidarum upon offspring cardiometabolic risk factors.

DESIGN:

This study is part of the prospective follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986.

SETTING:

Between 1 July 1985 and 30 June 1986 all pregnant women in two provinces of Finland were recruited at first antenatal visit (99% of eligible participated).

POPULATION:

A total of 8953 women with liveborn singleton offspring who consented to having their children followed-up were included.

METHODS:

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) was defined as hospitalisation during pregnancy for HG based on the International Classification of Disease (ICD) code. Women who were not hospitalised for HG during pregnancy were used as a reference group. Data on pregnancy and birth outcomes were obtained via medical records and questionnaires; 6462 adolescents, aged 16 years, underwent anthropometric measurements (HG n = 42, reference n = 6420) and 5648 adolescents had a fasting blood sample taken (HG n = 36, reference n = 5612).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting glucose, and lipid levels in offspring.

RESULTS:

Multivariate regression analyses showed no differences in offspring BMI (kg/m2 ; adjusted percentage difference HG versus reference, 2.2; 95% CI -0.1, 4.6), systolic blood pressure (adjusted difference 2.1 mmHg; 95% CI -1.5, 5.6), and fasting blood glucose (mmol/l; adjusted percentage difference, 2.3; 95% CI -0.6, 5.4), between adolescents born to mothers with and without HG.

CONCLUSIONS:

We found no evidence that prenatal exposure to HG has negative consequences for cardiometabolic health of offspring at the age of 16 years.

TWEETABLE ABSTRACT:

Hyperemesis gravidarum does not affect cardiometabolic health in adolescent offspring.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiometabolic risk; hyperemesis gravidarum; offspring; pregnancy

PMID:
28236378
DOI:
10.1111/1471-0528.14534
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