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Osteoporos Int. 2017 Jun;28(6):1765-1769. doi: 10.1007/s00198-017-3976-5. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

Imminent fracture risk.

Roux C1,2,3, Briot K4,5.

Author information

1
Paris Descartes University, Paris, France. christian.roux@aphp.fr.
2
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Research Center, UMR U1153, Paris, France. christian.roux@aphp.fr.
3
Department of Rheumatology, Cochin Hospital, Assistance-Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. christian.roux@aphp.fr.
4
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Sorbonne Paris Cité Research Center, UMR U1153, Paris, France.
5
Department of Rheumatology, Cochin Hospital, Assistance-Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Abstract

The clinical significance of osteoporosis is in the occurrence of fractures and re-fractures. The main risk factor of sustaining a fracture is a previous one, but a recent fracture is a better fracture risk factor than fracture history. The role of the recency of fracture has been shown for both vertebral and non-vertebral fracture risk. This imminent risk is explained by both bone-related factors (underlying osteoporosis) and fall-related factors (including those related to postfracture care). Such a short-term increased risk has been shown also in patients initiating corticosteroids and in frail osteoporotic subjects with central nervous system (CNS) diseases or drugs targeting CNS, and thus a high risk of falls. Patients with an imminent (i.e. 2 years) risk of fracture or refracture should be identified in priority in order to receive an immediate treatment and a program of fall prevention.

KEYWORDS:

Fracture; Imminent; Osteoporosis; Treatment

PMID:
28236126
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-017-3976-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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