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J Autism Dev Disord. 2017 May;47(5):1551-1558. doi: 10.1007/s10803-017-3054-z.

Brief Report: An Exploratory Study of the Diagnostic Reliability for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Taylor LJ1,2,3, Eapen V4,5, Maybery M6,4, Midford S4,7, Paynter J4,8,9, Quarmby L10, Smith T4,11, Williams K4,12,13,14, Whitehouse AJ4,15.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. lauren.taylor@kcl.ac.uk.
2
Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Fig Tree Pocket, Queensland, Australia. lauren.taylor@kcl.ac.uk.
3
Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, Henry Wellcome Building, De Crespigny Park, Denmark Hill, Box PO77, London, SE5 8AF, UK. lauren.taylor@kcl.ac.uk.
4
Cooperative Research Centre for Living with Autism (Autism CRC), Fig Tree Pocket, Queensland, Australia.
5
University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales, Australia.
6
School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
7
Western Australian Autism Diagnostician's Forum, Perth, Australia.
8
Research Department, AEIOU Foundation, Queensland, Australia.
9
School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia.
10
Centre for Rural Health, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
11
Disability Services Commission, West Perth, Australia.
12
Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
13
Developmental Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
14
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
15
Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

Abstract

Previous research shows inconsistency in clinician-assigned diagnoses of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We conducted an exploratory study that examined the concordance of diagnoses between a multidisciplinary assessment team and a range of independent clinicians throughout Australia. Nine video-taped Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) assessments were collected from two Australian sites. Twenty-seven Australian health professionals each observed two video-recordings and rated the degree to which the individual met the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. There was 100% agreement on the diagnostic classification for only 3 of the 9 video clips (33%), with the remaining 6 clips (66%) reaching poor reliability. In addition, only 24% of the participating clinicians achieved 'good' or 'excellent' levels of agreement (Cohen's kappa > 0.6) with the original ASD assessment. These findings have implications for clinical guidelines for ASD assessments.

KEYWORDS:

Diagnosis; Reliability

PMID:
28233080
DOI:
10.1007/s10803-017-3054-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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