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Herz. 2017 Apr;42(2):162-170. doi: 10.1007/s00059-017-4549-2.

Avoiding sports-related sudden cardiac death in children with congenital channelopathy : Recommendations for sports activities.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology and Angiology I, Heart Center University of Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106, Freiburg, Germany.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.
3
Department of Cardiology and Angiology I, Heart Center University of Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106, Freiburg, Germany. katja.odening@universitaets-herzzentrum.de.
4
Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. katja.odening@universitaets-herzzentrum.de.
5
Institute for Experimental Cardiovascular Medicine, Heart Center University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. katja.odening@universitaets-herzzentrum.de.

Abstract

For the past few years, children affected by an inherited channelopathy have been counseled to avoid (recreational) sports activities and all competitive sports so as to prevent exercise-induced arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. An increased understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, better anti-arrhythmic strategies, and, in particular, more epidemiological data on exercise-induced arrhythmia in active athletes with channelopathies have changed the universal recommendation of "no sports," leading to revised, less strict, and more differentiated guidelines (published by the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology in 2015). In this review, we outline the disease- and genotype-specific mechanisms of exercise-induced arrhythmia; give an overview of trigger-, symptom-, and genotype-dependent guidance in sports activities for children with long QT syndrome (LQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), or short QT syndrome (SQTS); and highlight the novelties in the current guidelines compared with previous versions. While it is still recommended for patients with LQT1 and CPVT (even when asymptomatic) and all symptomatic LQTS patients (independent of genotype) to avoid any competitive and high-intensity sports, other LQTS patients successfully treated with anti-arrhythmic therapies and phenotype-negative genotype-positive patients may be allowed to perform sports at different activity levels - provided they undergo regular, sophisticated evaluations to detect any changes in arrhythmogenic risk.

KEYWORDS:

Channelopathies; Children; Long QT syndrome; Sports; Sudden cardiac death

PMID:
28233036
DOI:
10.1007/s00059-017-4549-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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