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Neuroimage. 2017 Jun;153:399-409. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.02.030. Epub 2017 Feb 14.

Improving data availability for brain image biobanking in healthy subjects: Practice-based suggestions from an international multidisciplinary working group.

Author information

1
Geriatric Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK; Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, a Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Edinburgh,UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: Susan.Shenkin@ed.ac.uk.
2
Scottish Imaging Network, a Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Edinburgh,UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK; Edinburgh Imaging, University of Edinburgh, UK.
3
Department of Statistics & WMG, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK.
4
Henry H. Wheeler, Jr. Brain Imaging Center Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, 132 Barker Hall, Office 210S, MC 3190, Berkeley, CA, USA.
5
Division of Brain Sciences, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London W12 0NN, UK.
6
Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
7
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, UK.
8
International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels väg 15A, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Groupe d'Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, Institut des maladies neurodégénératives, Université de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS, UMR5293, France.
10
MRC Centre for Reproductive Health, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK.
11
Keck USC School of Medicine; NIH ENIGMA Center for Worldwide Medicine, Imaging and Genomics; Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Engineering & Ophthalmology; USC Imaging Genetics Center, Marina del Rey, CA, USA.
12
Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 8-11 Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.
13
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.
14
Centre for Medical Informatics, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, UK.
15
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, a Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Edinburgh,UK.
16
Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK; Scottish Imaging Network, a Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Edinburgh,UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK; Edinburgh Imaging, University of Edinburgh, UK.
17
Scottish Imaging Network, a Platform for Scientific Excellence (SINAPSE) Collaboration, Edinburgh,UK; Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, University of Edinburgh, UK.

Abstract

Brain imaging is now ubiquitous in clinical practice and research. The case for bringing together large amounts of image data from well-characterised healthy subjects and those with a range of common brain diseases across the life course is now compelling. This report follows a meeting of international experts from multiple disciplines, all interested in brain image biobanking. The meeting included neuroimaging experts (clinical and non-clinical), computer scientists, epidemiologists, clinicians, ethicists, and lawyers involved in creating brain image banks. The meeting followed a structured format to discuss current and emerging brain image banks; applications such as atlases; conceptual and statistical problems (e.g. defining 'normality'); legal, ethical and technological issues (e.g. consents, potential for data linkage, data security, harmonisation, data storage and enabling of research data sharing). We summarise the lessons learned from the experiences of a wide range of individual image banks, and provide practical recommendations to enhance creation, use and reuse of neuroimaging data. Our aim is to maximise the benefit of the image data, provided voluntarily by research participants and funded by many organisations, for human health. Our ultimate vision is of a federated network of brain image biobanks accessible for large studies of brain structure and function.

KEYWORDS:

Brain image biobank; Data sharing; Neuroimaging

PMID:
28232121
PMCID:
PMC5798604
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.02.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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