Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Foods. 2017 Feb 22;6(2). pii: E16. doi: 10.3390/foods6020016.

Can the Palatability of Healthy, Satiety-Promoting Foods Increase with Repeated Exposure during Weight Loss?

Author information

1
Department of Human Ecology, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272, USA. kanguah@latech.edu.
2
Department of Nutrition Science and the Ingestive Behavior Research Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. kanguah@latech.edu.
3
School of Public Health, The University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. jlovejoy@arivale.com.
4
Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA 98019, USA. jlovejoy@arivale.com.
5
Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. bacraig@stat.purdue.edu.
6
The School of Nutrition and Exercise Science, and the Bastyr University Research Institute, Bastyr University, Kenmore, WA 98028, USA. mal.gehrke@gmail.com.
7
The School of Nutrition and Exercise Science, and the Bastyr University Research Institute, Bastyr University, Kenmore, WA 98028, USA. phil@nutritionalternatives.com.
8
The School of Nutrition and Exercise Science, and the Bastyr University Research Institute, Bastyr University, Kenmore, WA 98028, USA. petraelena@gmail.com.
9
Department of Health Sciences, Programs in Nutrition, Boston University/College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, Boston, MA 02215, USA. mamccr@bu.edu.
10
Boston Nutrition and Obesity Research Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA. mamccr@bu.edu.

Abstract

Repeated exposure to sugary, fatty, and salty foods often enhances their appeal. However, it is unknown if exposure influences learned palatability of foods typically promoted as part of a healthy diet. We tested whether the palatability of pulse containing foods provided during a weight loss intervention which were particularly high in fiber and low in energy density would increase with repeated exposure. At weeks 0, 3, and 6, participants (n = 42; body mass index (BMI) 31.2 ± 4.3 kg/m²) were given a test battery of 28 foods, approximately half which had been provided as part of the intervention, while the remaining half were not foods provided as part of the intervention. In addition, about half of each of the foods (provided as part or not provided as part of the intervention) contained pulses. Participants rated the taste, appearance, odor, and texture pleasantness of each food, and an overall flavor pleasantness score was calculated as the mean of these four scores. Linear mixed model analyses showed an exposure type by week interaction effect for taste, texture and overall flavor pleasantness indicating statistically significant increases in ratings of provided foods in taste and texture from weeks 0 to 3 and 0 to 6, and overall flavor from weeks 0 to 6. Repeated exposure to these foods, whether they contained pulses or not, resulted in a ~4% increase in pleasantness ratings. The long-term clinical relevance of this small increase requires further study.

KEYWORDS:

palatability; pulses; repeated exposure; weight loss

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center