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Brain Sci. 2017 Feb 20;7(2). pii: E22. doi: 10.3390/brainsci7020022.

Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038, USA. gallaway@email.arizona.edu.
2
Nishinomiya Kyoritsu Neurosurgical Hospital, Hyogo 663-8211, Japan. miyake@nk-hospital.or.jp.
3
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232-5280, USA. maciej.buchowski@vanderbilt.edu.
4
Chiba Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Chiba 261-0014, Japan. mieko.shimada@cpuhs.ac.jp.
5
National Institute of Fitness & Sport in Kanoya, Kagoshima 891-2311, Japan. yositake@nifs-k.ac.jp.
6
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038, USA. ask1@email.arizona.edu.
7
Department of Nutritional Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038, USA. hongu@email.arizona.edu.

Abstract

A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA) with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA's role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; aging; cognitive decline; dementia; health; mild cognitive impairment; physical activity

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