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Immunol Cell Biol. 2017 Aug;95(7):601-610. doi: 10.1038/icb.2017.13. Epub 2017 Feb 23.

Evaluation of trained immunity by β-1, 3 (d)-glucan on murine monocytes in vitro and duration of response in vivo.

Author information

1
Experimental Therapeutics Laboratory, Hanson and Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Pharmacy and Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
2
Department of Surgery, Center of Excellence in Inflammation, Infectious Disease and Immunity, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA.
3
Robinson Research Institute and Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Abstract

The β-1, 3 (d)-glucan (β-glucan) present in the cell wall of Candida albicans induces epigenetic changes in human monocytes resulting in primed macrophages exhibiting increased cytokine responsiveness to reinfection. This phenomenon is referred to as trained immunity or innate immune memory. However, whether β-glucan can reprogramme murine monocytes in vitro or induce lasting effects in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Thus, purified murine spleen-derived monocytes were primed with β-glucan in vitro and assessed for markers of differentiation and survival. Important macrophage cell markers during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation were downregulated and survival enhanced due to partial inhibition of apoptosis. Increased survival and not the β-glucan training effect explained the elevated production of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced by subsequent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. In vivo, 4 days after systemic administration of β-glucan, mice were more responsive to LPS challenge as shown by the increased serum levels of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10, an effect shown to be short lived as enhanced cytokine production was lost by day 20. Here, we have characterised murine macrophages derived from β-glucan-primed monocytes based on their surface marker expression and for the first time provide evidence that the training effect of β-glucan in vivo declines within a 3-week period.

PMID:
28228641
PMCID:
PMC5550561
DOI:
10.1038/icb.2017.13
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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