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Indian Heart J. 2017 Jan - Feb;69(1):43-47. doi: 10.1016/j.ihj.2016.06.006. Epub 2016 Jun 29.

Clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in the Indian Heart Rhythm Society-Atrial Fibrillation (IHRS-AF) registry.

Author information

1
Arrhythmia Associates, Mumbai, India. Electronic address: amvora@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post-Graduate Institute, Lucknow, India.
3
Holy Family Hospital, New Delhi, India.
4
Arrhythmia Associates, Mumbai, India.
5
Division of Electrophysiology, Care Hospital, Hyderabad, India.
6
Narayana Hrudyalaya Hospital, Bengaluru, India.
7
Department of Cardiology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India.
8
Department of Cardiology, Sri Chitra Trinumal Hospital, Trivandrum, India.
9
KIMS Hospitals, Hyderabad, India.
10
Cardiac Pacing & Electrophysiology, Fortis Escorts Hospital, New Delhi, India.
11
Department of Cardiology, KEM Hospital, Mumbai, India.
12
Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India.
13
Cardiology Department, Apollo Hospital, Guwahati, India.
14
Department of Cardiology, AIIMS Hospital, New Delhi, India.
15
Cardiology, Baby Memorial Hospital, Kozhikode, India.
16
Madras Medical Mission Hospital, Chennai, India.
17
Lilavati Hospital, Mumbai, India.
18
Division of Electrophysiology, CIMS Hospital, Ahmedabad, India.
19
M.S. Ramaiah Memorial Hospital, Bengaluru, India.
20
Department of Cardiology, Railway Hospital, Chennai, India.
21
Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry, India.
22
Division of Electrophysiology, Max Superspeciality Hospital, Delhi, India.
23
Division of Electrophysiology, Lisie Hospital, Kochi, India.
24
Frontier Lifeline Hospital, Chennai, India.
25
Quintiles Cardiac Safety Services, Mumbai, India.

Abstract

AIM:

A national atrial fibrillation (AF) registry was conducted under the aegis of the Indian Heart Rhythm Society (IHRS), to capture epidemiological data-type of AF, clinical presentation and comorbidities, current treatment practices, and 1-year follow-up outcomes.

METHODS:

A total of 1537 patients were enrolled from 24 sites in India in the IHRS-AF registry from July 2011 to August 2012. Their baseline characteristics and follow-up data were recorded in case report forms and subsequently analyzed.

RESULTS:

The average age of Indian AF patients was 54.7 years. There was a marginal female preponderance - 51.5% females and 48.5% males. At baseline, 20.4% had paroxysmal AF; 33% had persistent AF; 35.1% had permanent AF and 11% had first AF episode. At one-year follow-up, 45.6% patients had permanent AF. Rheumatic valvular heart disease (RHD) was present in 47.6% of patients. Hypertension, heart failure, coronary artery disease, and diabetes were seen in 31.4%, 18.7%, 16.2%, and 16.1%, respectively. Rate control was the strategy used in 75.2% patients, digoxin and beta-blockers being the most frequently prescribed rate-control drugs. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) drugs were used in 70% of patients. The annual mortality was 6.5%, hospitalization 8%, and incidence of stroke 1%.

CONCLUSIONS:

In India, AF patients are younger and RHD is still the most frequent etiology. Almost two-third of the patients have persistent/permanent AF. At one-year follow-up, there is a significant mortality and morbidity in AF patients in India.

KEYWORDS:

Antiarrhythmic drugs; Anticoagulation; Atrial fibrillation; Epidemiology; Rheumatic heart disease

PMID:
28228305
PMCID:
PMC5319007
DOI:
10.1016/j.ihj.2016.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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