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Clin Neurophysiol. 2017 Apr;128(4):538-548. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2016.12.026. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Neural correlates of lexical decisions in Parkinson's disease revealed with multivariate extraction of cortico-subthalamic interactions.

Author information

1
Neurophysics Group, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: friederike.hohlefeld@gmx.de.
2
Department of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Motor and Cognition Group, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.
4
Motor Neuroscience Group, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow, Berlin, Germany.
5
Neurophysics Group, Department of Neurology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany; Department of Neurology, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Neural interactions between cortex and basal ganglia are pivotal for sensorimotor processing. Specifically, coherency between cortex and subthalamic structures is a frequently studied phenomenon in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, it is unknown whether cortico-subthalamic coherency might also relate to cognitive aspects of task performance, e.g., language processing. Furthermore, standard coherency studies are challenged by how to efficiently handle multi-channel recordings.

METHODS:

In eight patients with Parkinson's disease treated with deep brain stimulation, simultaneous recordings of surface electroencephalography and deep local field potentials were obtained from bilateral subthalamic nuclei, during performing a lexical decision task. A recent multivariate coherency measure (maximized imaginary part of coherency, MIC) was applied, simultaneously accounting for multi-channel recordings.

RESULTS:

Cortico-subthalamic synchronization (MIC) in 14-35Hz oscillations positively correlated with accuracy in lexical decisions across patients, but not in 7-13Hz oscillations. In contrast to multivariate MIC, no significant correlation was obtained when extracting cortico-subthalamic synchronization by "standard" bivariate coherency.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cortico-subthalamic synchronization may relate to non-motor aspects of task performance, here reflected in lexical accuracy.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The results tentatively suggest the relevance of cortico-subthalamic interactions for lexical decisions. Multivariate coherency might be effective to extract neural synchronization from multi-channel recordings.

KEYWORDS:

Basal ganglia; Beta; Deep brain stimulation; Language; Oscillations; STN

PMID:
28226288
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2016.12.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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