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Sci Rep. 2017 Feb 22;7:43001. doi: 10.1038/srep43001.

Preoperative red cell distribution width and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio predict survival in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University (Yunnan Tumor Hospital), 519 Kunzhou Road, Kunming 650118, China.
2
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester 55905, USA.
3
Institute of Medical Information, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100020, China.

Abstract

Several parameters of preoperative complete blood count (CBC) and inflammation-associated blood cell markers derived from them have been reported to correlate with prognosis in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), but their prognostic importance and optimal cutoffs are still needed be elucidated. Clinic/pathological parameters, 5-year follow-up data and preoperative CBC parameters were obtained retrospectively in 654 EOC patients underwent primary surgery at Mayo Clinic. Cutoffs for neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR) were optimized by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Prognostic significance for overall survival (OS) and recurrence free survival (RFS) were determined by Cox proportional hazards models and Kaplan-Meier method. Associations of RDW and NLR with clinic/pathological parameters were analyzed using non-parametric tests. RDW with cutoff 14.5 and NLR with cutoff 5.25 had independent prognostic significance for OS, while combined RDW and NLR scores stratified patients into low (RDW-low and NLR-low), intermediate (RDW-high or NLR-high) and high risk (RDW-high and NLR-high) groups, especially in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Moreover, high NLR was associated with poor RFS as well. Elevated RDW was strongly associated with age, whereas high NLR was strongly associated with stage, preoperative CA125 level and ascites at surgery.

PMID:
28223716
PMCID:
PMC5320446
DOI:
10.1038/srep43001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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