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MBio. 2017 Feb 21;8(1). pii: e00066-17. doi: 10.1128/mBio.00066-17.

Raising the Alarmone: Within-Host Evolution of Antibiotic-Tolerant Enterococcus faecium.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, Massachusetts, USA vantyne@fas.harvard.edu michael_gilmore@meei.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

Enterococci are ancient commensal bacteria that recently emerged as leading causes of antibiotic-resistant, hospital-acquired infection. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) epitomize why drug-resistant enterococcal infections are a problem: VRE readily colonize the antibiotic-perturbed gastrointestinal (GI) tract where they amplify to large numbers, and from there, they infect other body sites, including the bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical wounds. VRE are resistant to many antimicrobials and host defenses, which facilitates establishment at the site of infection and confounds therapeutic clearance. Having evolved to colonize the GI tract, VRE are comparatively ill adapted to the human bloodstream. A recent study by Honsa and colleagues (E. S. Honsa et al., mBio 8:e02124-16, 2017, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02124-16) found that a strain of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium evolved antibiotic tolerance within the bloodstream of an immunocompromised host by activating the stringent response through mutation of relA Precisely how VRE colonize and infect and the selective pressures that led to the outgrowth of relA mutants are the subjects of ongoing research.

PMID:
28223450
PMCID:
PMC5358907
DOI:
10.1128/mBio.00066-17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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