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Nat Commun. 2017 Feb 21;8:14140. doi: 10.1038/ncomms14140.

Blunted ventral striatal responses to anticipated rewards foreshadow problematic drug use in novelty-seeking adolescents.

Author information

1
Department of Systems Neuroscience, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf, 20246 Hamburg, Germany.
2
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
3
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany.
4
Institute of Neuroscience and Discipline of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
5
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London SE5 8AF, UK.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montreal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3C 3J7.
7
Department of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany.
8
Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, 14 CEA, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin bat 145, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
9
Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
10
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401, USA.
11
School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD, UK.
12
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charité Mitte, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 10117 Berlin, Germany.
13
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), 10587 Berlin, Germany.
14
Department of Addictive Behaviour and Addiction Medicine, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159 Mannheim, Germany.
15
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, INSERM Unit 1000 'Imaging &Psychiatry', University Paris-Sud, 91400 Orsay, France.
16
Maison de Solenn, APHP Ho^pital Cochin, University Paris Descartes, 75006 Paris, France.
17
McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3A 1A4.
18
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E6.
19
School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD, UK.
20
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2B4.
21
The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Canada, M5G 1X8.
22
Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK.
23
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, and Neuroimaging Center, Technische Universität Dresden, 01307 Dresden, Germany.
24
MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry (SGDP) Centre, London SE5 8AF, UK.

Abstract

Novelty-seeking tendencies in adolescents may promote innovation as well as problematic impulsive behaviour, including drug abuse. Previous research has not clarified whether neural hyper- or hypo-responsiveness to anticipated rewards promotes vulnerability in these individuals. Here we use a longitudinal design to track 144 novelty-seeking adolescents at age 14 and 16 to determine whether neural activity in response to anticipated rewards predicts problematic drug use. We find that diminished BOLD activity in mesolimbic (ventral striatal and midbrain) and prefrontal cortical (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) regions during reward anticipation at age 14 predicts problematic drug use at age 16. Lower psychometric conscientiousness and steeper discounting of future rewards at age 14 also predicts problematic drug use at age 16, but the neural responses independently predict more variance than psychometric measures. Together, these findings suggest that diminished neural responses to anticipated rewards in novelty-seeking adolescents may increase vulnerability to future problematic drug use.

PMID:
28221370
PMCID:
PMC5321762
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms14140
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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