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Int J Cancer. 2017 May 15;140(10):2246-2255. doi: 10.1002/ijc.30659. Epub 2017 Mar 9.

Coffee, tea and melanoma risk: findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

Author information

1
Cancer Risk Factors and Lifestyle Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute (ISPO), Florence, Italy.
2
CESP, Fac. de médecine-Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine-UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, 94805, France.
3
Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, 94805, France.
4
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital-University of Turin and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy.
5
Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Turin, Italy.
6
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
7
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
8
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Unit of Diet, Genes and Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
9
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
10
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Germany.
11
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
12
WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Greece.
13
Lombardy Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
14
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
15
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP, Ragusa, Italy.
16
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Envirnoment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
17
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
18
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
19
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
20
Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway.
21
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
22
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
23
Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
24
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
25
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain.
26
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
27
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdsSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
28
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (IBS), Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
29
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Donostia, Spain.
30
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain.
31
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional research and Arcum-Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
32
Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
33
Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Division of Oncology and Pathology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
34
Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
35
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
36
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
37
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
38
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
39
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
40
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
41
Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway.
42
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
43
Genetic Epidemiology group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

In vitro and animal studies suggest that bioactive constituents of coffee and tea may have anticarcinogenic effects against cutaneous melanoma; however, epidemiological evidence is limited to date. We examined the relationships between coffee (total, caffeinated or decaffeinated) and tea consumption and risk of melanoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a multicentre prospective study that enrolled over 500,000 participants aged 25-70 years from ten European countries in 1992-2000. Information on coffee and tea drinking was collected at baseline using validated country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between coffee and tea consumption and melanoma risk. Overall, 2,712 melanoma cases were identified during a median follow-up of 14.9 years among 476,160 study participants. Consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men (HR for highest quartile of consumption vs. non-consumers 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69) but not among women (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.62-1.47). There were no statistically significant associations between consumption of decaffeinated coffee or tea and the risk of melanoma among both men and women. The consumption of caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with melanoma risk among men in this large cohort study. Further investigations are warranted to confirm our findings and clarify the possible role of caffeine and other coffee compounds in reducing the risk of melanoma.

KEYWORDS:

coffee; cohort study; melanoma; risk; tea

PMID:
28218395
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.30659
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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