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Am J Kidney Dis. 2017 Jul;70(1):38-47. doi: 10.1053/j.ajkd.2016.10.035. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

Food Insecurity, CKD, and Subsequent ESRD in US Adults.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA. Electronic address: banerjeet@medsfgh.ucsf.edu.
2
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD.
3
Texas A&M College of Medicine and Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, TX.
4
Kidney Epidemiology & Cost Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
5
Kidney Epidemiology & Cost Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
6
Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
7
Department of Medicine, Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Poor access to food among low-income adults has been recognized as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), but there are no data for the impact of food insecurity on progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We hypothesized that food insecurity would be independently associated with risk for ESRD among persons with and without earlier stages of CKD.

STUDY DESIGN:

Longitudinal cohort study.

SETTING & PARTICIPANTS:

2,320 adults (aged ≥ 20 years) with CKD and 10,448 adults with no CKD enrolled in NHANES III (1988-1994) with household income ≤ 400% of the federal poverty level linked to the Medicare ESRD Registry for a median follow-up of 12 years.

PREDICTOR:

Food insecurity, defined as an affirmative response to the food-insecurity screening question.

OUTCOME:

Development of ESRD.

MEASUREMENTS:

Demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. Dietary acid load was estimated from 24-hour dietary recall. We used a Fine-Gray competing-risk model to estimate the relative hazard (RH) for ESRD associated with food insecurity after adjusting for covariates.

RESULTS:

4.5% of adults with CKD were food insecure. Food-insecure individuals were more likely to be younger and have diabetes (29.9%), hypertension (73.9%), or albuminuria (90.4%) as compared with their counterparts (P<0.05). Median dietary acid load in the food-secure versus food-insecure group was 51.2 mEq/d versus 55.6 mEq/d, respectively (P=0.05). Food-insecure adults were more likely to develop ESRD (RH, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.08-3.10) compared with food-secure adults after adjustment for demographics, income, diabetes, hypertension, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and albuminuria. In the non-CKD group, 5.7% were food insecure. We did not find a significant association between food insecurity and ESRD (RH, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.40-1.49).

LIMITATIONS:

Use of single 24-hour diet recall; lack of laboratory follow-up data and measure of changes in food insecurity over time; follow-up of cohort ended 10 years ago.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among adults with CKD, food insecurity was independently associated with a higher likelihood of developing ESRD. Innovative approaches to address food insecurity should be tested for their impact on CKD outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Food insecurity; NHANES; chronic kidney disease (CKD); dietary acid load (DAL); dietary patterns; disease trajectory; end-stage renal disease (ESRD); food deserts; health disparities; incident ESRD; kidney disease progression; modifiable risk factor; nutrient intake; poverty; socioeconomic status

PMID:
28215947
PMCID:
PMC5765854
DOI:
10.1053/j.ajkd.2016.10.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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