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Ann Epidemiol. 2017 Mar;27(3):187-193.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.01.004. Epub 2017 Jan 19.

Earlier age at menarche in girls with rapid early life growth: cohort and within sibling analyses.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY.
2
The Center for Research on Women and Children's Health, The Child Health and Development Studies, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, CA.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY.
4
Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY.
5
Department of Epidemiology, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA; Institute for Prevention and Cancer Epidemiology, Freiburg University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY; Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; The Imprints Center for Genetic and Environmental Lifecourse Studies, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY. Electronic address: mt146@columbia.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the article was to examine the association of early life growth with age at menarche.

METHODS:

Using data from a prospective birth cohort (n = 1134 women, 290 sibling sets), we assessed the association between postnatal growth at 4 months, 1 year, and 4 years and age at menarche, using generalized estimating equations and generalized linear random effects models.

RESULTS:

Overall, 18% of the cohort experienced early menarche (<12 years). After accounting for postnatal growth in length, faster postnatal change in weight (per 10-percentile increase) in all three periods was associated with an increase (range 9%-20%) in the likelihood of having an early menarche. In adjusted linear models, faster weight gains in infancy and childhood were associated with an average age at menarche that was 1.1-1.3 months earlier compared with stable growth. The overall results were consistent for percentile and conditional growth models. Girls who experienced rapid growth (defined as increasing across two major Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth percentiles) in early infancy had an average age at menarche that was 4.6 months earlier than girls whose growth was stable.

CONCLUSIONS:

Faster postnatal weight gains in infancy and early childhood before the age of 4 years are associated with earlier age at menarche.

KEYWORDS:

Birthweight; Childhood growth; Infant growth; Lifecourse epidemiology; Maternal; Menarche; Prenatal; Puberty

PMID:
28215584
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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