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Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol. 2017 Sep;41(4):459-465. doi: 10.1016/j.clinre.2016.12.007. Epub 2017 Feb 16.

Decreased glucagon-like peptide-1 correlates with abdominal pain in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Dalian friendship Hospital, Dalian, Liaoning 116001, PR China.
2
Department of Gastroenterology, Jinshan hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 201508, PR China. Electronic address: xiaomingfan57@hotmail.com.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, Dalian friendship Hospital, Dalian, Liaoning 116001, PR China. Electronic address: yonghongs@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, ROSE-010, plays a critical role in alleviating abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, the underling mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we determined the serum GLP-1 level in patients with constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C). The relationship between GLP-1 and abdominal pain was investigated. In addition, the expression of the GLP-1 receptor in the colon was determined.

METHODS:

Rectosigmoid biopsies were gathered from 38 patients with IBS-C who met the Rome III criteria, and 22 healthy controls. Abdominal pain was quantified by a validated questionnaire. Serum GLP-1 was measured by ELISA and correlated with abdominal pain scores. The presence of the GLP-1 receptor in the colonic mucosa was assessed by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS:

Serum GLP-1 was substantially decreased in patients with IBS-C. Decreased serum GLP-1 had a negative correlation with the abdominal pain scores. Biopsies from patients with IBS-C revealed a significant down-regulation of the GLP-1 receptor in colonic mucosa compared with control subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

Decreased serum GLP-1 correlates with abdominal pain in patients with IBS-C. Decreased expression of GLP-1 and GLP-1 receptor may be the basis for alleviation of abdominal pain in patients with IBS-C by ROSE-010.

PMID:
28215540
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinre.2016.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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