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Addict Behav. 2017 Jul;70:72-78. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.02.010. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Characterizing users of new psychoactive substances using psychometric scales for risk-related behavior.

Author information

1
Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction (Trimbos Institute), Department of Drug Monitoring & Policy, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Psychology, Section Health, Medical, and Neuropsychology, Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands.
2
Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction (Trimbos Institute), Department of Drug Monitoring & Policy, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
3
Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction (Trimbos Institute), Department of Drug Monitoring & Policy, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: tbrunt@trimbos.nl.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Studies investigating risk-related behavior in relation to new psychoactive substance (NPS) use are sparse. The current study investigated characteristics of NPS users by comparing risk-related behavior of NPS users to that of illicit drugs (ID) users and licit substances users and non-users (NLC) users.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional study we included 528 individuals across an age range of 18-72years. Using a web-based questionnaire we collected self-report data on substance use, sensation seeking, impulsivity, peer substance use and risk perception of substance use.

RESULTS:

NPS and ID users had a higher level of sensation seeking compared to NLC users (NPS users: p<0.001; ID users: p<0.001). NPS users (p<0.001), but not ID users (p=0.16), had increased levels of impulsivity compared to NLC users. NPS users had significantly higher scores for sensation seeking (F1,423=51.52, p<0.001) and impulsivity (F1,423=6.15, p=0.01) compared to ID users. Additionally, NPS users had significantly more peers who use substances compared to ID and NLC users. Also, NPS and ID users had lower risk perception for most substances than NLC users. NPS users had lower risk perception for most substances than ID users.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings highlight that NPS users show substantial more risk-related behavior than both ID and NLC users. Therefore, NPS users might be considered as a distinctive group of substance users that need another approach in terms of prevention.

KEYWORDS:

Illicit drugs; Impulsivity; New psychoactive substances; Peer substance use; Risk-related behavior; Sensation seeking

PMID:
28214739
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.02.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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