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Addict Behav. 2017 Jul;70:61-64. doi: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.02.008. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

Identification of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use disorder: A case report.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: godersky@bu.edu.
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: laurakv@bu.edu.
3
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, USA; Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: alicia.ventura@bmc.org.
4
Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: awalley@bu.edu.
5
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 4th Floor, Boston, MA, USA; Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, 801 Massachusetts Ave, 2nd Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: rsaitz@bu.edu.

Abstract

Commonly used for analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used medications in the world. In spite of their prevalence, reports of NSAID misuse and NSAID use disorder are uncommon. This case report describes a research participant who met criteria for DSM-5 moderate substance use disorder based on her use of prescribed ibuprofen as assessed by the validated Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). This case demonstrates that the DSM-5 criteria within the MINI can be applied to diagnose an NSAID use disorder. Addiction researchers and clinicians should consider medications generally not thought to be addictive, like NSAIDs, when evaluating patients for substance use disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Case report; Dependence; Diagnosis; NSAID; Substance use disorder

PMID:
28214737
PMCID:
PMC5370578
DOI:
10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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