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Trends Cogn Sci. 2017 Apr;21(4):265-276. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2017.01.007. Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Social Decision-Making and the Brain: A Comparative Perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
2
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
3
Department of Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Marketing, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Electronic address: mplatt@mail.med.upenn.edu.

Abstract

The capacity and motivation to be social is a key component of the human adaptive behavioral repertoire. Recent research has identified social behaviors remarkably similar to our own in other animals, including empathy, consolation, cooperation, and strategic deception. Moreover, neurobiological studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents have identified shared brain structures (the so-called 'social brain') apparently specialized to mediate such functions. Neuromodulators may regulate social interactions by 'tuning' the social brain, with important implications for treating social impairments. Here, we survey recent findings in social neuroscience from a comparative perspective, and conclude that the very social behaviors that make us human emerge from mechanisms shared widely with other animals, as well as some that appear to be unique to humans and other primates.

PMID:
28214131
PMCID:
PMC5800770
DOI:
10.1016/j.tics.2017.01.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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