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Clin Nutr. 2018 Feb;37(1):56-60. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2017.02.004. Epub 2017 Feb 9.

Why intensity is not a bad word: Optimizing health status at any age.

Author information

1
Department of Human Studies, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA; Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA. Electronic address: ghunter@uab.edu.
2
Department of Human Studies, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA; Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA.

Abstract

Age-related declines in health and function make locomotion increasingly difficult leading to reductions in non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT), skeletal muscle size and strength, and increased adiposity. Exercise is an important strategy to attenuate loss of function through the life cycle. Despite claims to the contrary, high-intensity exercise is important for the prevention of obesity and sarcopenia with advancing age. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to present literature supporting the contention that low volume, high-intensity aerobic and/or resistance training can slow sarcopenia, sustain ease of movement, stimulate NEAT, and attenuate the accretion of fat mass.

KEYWORDS:

Energy expenditure; Exercise economy; High-intensity exercise; Physical activity; Resistance training; Sarcopenia

PMID:
28214041
PMCID:
PMC5550361
[Available on 2019-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2017.02.004

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