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Value Health. 2017 Jan;20(1):77-84. doi: 10.1016/j.jval.2016.08.735. Epub 2016 Nov 4.

The Burden of Obesity on Diabetes in the United States: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2008 to 2012.

Author information

1
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
2
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: changsh@wudosis.wustl.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diabetes is one of the most prevalent and costly chronic diseases in the United States.

OBJECTIVES:

To analyze the risk of developing diabetes and the annual cost of diabetes for a US general population.

METHODS:

Data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2008 to 2012, were used to analyze 1) probabilities of developing diabetes and 2) annual total health care expenditures for diabetics. The age-, sex-, race-, and body mass index (BMI)-specific risks of developing diabetes were estimated by fitting an exponential survival function to age at first diabetes diagnosis. Annual health care expenditures were estimated using a generalized linear model with log-link and gamma variance function. Complex sampling designs in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were adjusted for. All dollar values are presented in 2012 US dollars.

RESULTS:

We observed a more than 6 times increase in diabetes risks for class III obese (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) individuals compared with normal-weight individuals. Using age 50 years as an example, we found a more than 3 times increase in annual health care expenditures for those with diabetes ($13,581) compared with those without diabetes ($3,954). Compared with normal-weight (18.5 ≤ BMI < 25 kg/m2) individuals, class II obese (35 ≤ BMI < 40 kg/m2) and class III obese (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) individuals incurred an annual marginal cost of $628 and $756, respectively. The annual health care expenditure differentials between those with and without diabetes of age 50 years were the highest for individuals with class II ($12,907) and class III ($9,703) obesity.

CONCLUSIONS:

This article highlights the importance of obesity on diabetes burden. Our results suggested that obesity, in particular, class II and class III (i.e., BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) obesity, is associated with a substantial increase in the risk of developing diabetes and imposes a large economic burden.

KEYWORDS:

diabetes; economic burden; health care expenditures; obesity

PMID:
28212973
PMCID:
PMC5319814
DOI:
10.1016/j.jval.2016.08.735
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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