Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2017 Mar;76(3):377-390. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2016.07.064.

Psoriasis and comorbid diseases: Epidemiology.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: Junko.Takeshita@uphs.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and St. John's Institute of Dermatology, London, United Kingdom.
4
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Division of Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Department of Dermatology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia.
7
Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin that is increasingly being recognized as a systemic inflammatory disorder. Psoriatic arthritis is a well-known comorbidity of psoriasis. A rapidly expanding body of literature in various populations and settings supports additional associations between psoriasis and cardiometabolic diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, malignancy, infection, and mood disorders. The pathogenesis of comorbid disease in patients with psoriasis remains unknown; however, shared inflammatory pathways, cellular mediators, genetic susceptibility, and common risk factors are hypothesized to be contributing elements. As additional psoriasis comorbidities continue to emerge, education of health care providers is essential to ensuring comprehensive medical care for patients with psoriasis.

KEYWORDS:

Crohn's disease; cardiovascular disease; chronic kidney disease; comorbidities; depression; infection; lymphoma; metabolic syndrome; nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; psoriasis; psoriatic arthritis

PMID:
28212759
PMCID:
PMC5731650
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2016.07.064
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center