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NeuroRehabilitation. 2017;40(4):459-471. doi: 10.3233/NRE-171433.

Effectiveness and feasibility of eccentric and task-oriented strength training in individuals with stroke.

Author information

1
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Human Movement Sciences, Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands.
3
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Sports Medicine, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Strength training can increase function in individuals with stroke. However it is unclear which type of strength training is most effective and feasible.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the effect and feasibility of an intervention combining eccentric and task-oriented strength training in individuals with chronic stroke.

METHODS:

Eleven participants were randomly assigned to a group first receiving four weeks of eccentric strength training and then four weeks of task-oriented strength training (EST-TOST) or vice versa (TOST-EST). Strength and upper limb function were administered with a hand-held dynamometer (HHD) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) respectively. Feasibility was evaluated with the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (IMI), the adherence and drop-out rate.

RESULTS:

Significant increases were found in ARAT score (mean difference 7.3; p < 0.05) and in shoulder and elbow strength (mean difference respectively 23.96 N; p < 0.001 and 27.41 N; p < 0.003). Participants rated both EST and TOST with 81% on the IMI, the adherence rate was high and there was one drop-out.

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study show that a combination of eccentric and task-oriented strength training is an effective and feasible training method to increase function and strength in individuals with chronic stroke.

KEYWORDS:

Stroke; eccentric; effectiveness; feasibility; strength training; task-oriented

PMID:
28211820
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-171433
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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