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J Clin Virol. 2017 Jun;91:63-68. doi: 10.1016/j.jcv.2017.01.009. Epub 2017 Feb 7.

Highlights from the 2016 HIV diagnostics conference: The new landscape of HIV testing in laboratories, public health programs and clinical practice.

Author information

1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd NE Mailstop E46, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. Electronic address: lig7@cdc.gov.
2
David Axelrod Institute, Wadsworth Center NYS Department of Health, PO Box 22002, Albany, NY 12201-2002, USA. Electronic address: monica.parker@health.ny.gov.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd NE Mailstop E46, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. Electronic address: kdelaney@cdc.gov.
4
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1600 Clifton Rd NE Mailstop E46, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. Electronic address: smo2@cdc.gov.

Abstract

The 2016 HIV Diagnostics Conference, held in Atlanta, Georgia, was attended by public health officials, laboratorians, HIV testing program managers, surveillance coordinators and industry representatives. The conference addressed test performance data, the implementation of new testing algorithms, quality assurance, and the application of new tests in a variety of settings. With regard to the recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Association of Public Health Laboratories HIV laboratory testing algorithm, the conference featured performance data, implementation challenges such as a lack of test options for the second and third steps, as well as data needs for new tests that may be used as part of the algorithm. There are delays when nucleic acid testing is needed with the algorithm. Novel tests such as point of care nucleic acid tests are needed on the U.S. market to readily identify acute infection. Multiplex tests are being developed which allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. CDC staff highlighted new guidance for testing in non-clinical settings. Innovative approaches to linking testing and care in some settings have led to identification of early infections, improved receipt of test results and expedited initiation of therapy. Work continues to optimize testing so that infections are accurately identified as early as possible and time to treatment is minimized to improve health outcomes and prevent transmission.

KEYWORDS:

Algorithm; Conference; Diagnostics; HIV testing

PMID:
28209395
PMCID:
PMC5440191
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcv.2017.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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